Author: Betharoni

Rehearsal Section 3 Songs and Notes

Rehearsal Section 3 Songs and Notes:

People who need to attend Section 3 rehearsal

Izzy

Jesse

Bree

Natalie

Carlie

Evie

Ian

Gabe

Again, we’ll be working on choreography, so come ready to move about. We might duck back and work a little on Wandering Minstrel at bit as well. Pooh and Ko-Ko will either need to run through their dialogue in section three of their own accord or during this rehearsal – whatever they prefer.

Please rehearse songs + sections on your own that we have already covered. So in addition to listening to songs and reading through section 3 this week, you should still be working on section 1 as well. Sing the songs a lot! Any work ahead you want to do as well is great, but at a minimum, you should be working on these items.

  • Behold the Lord High Executioner

Lord High Executioner

Note: Starred (*) sections are sung simultaneously/with overlap.

CHORUS
Behold the Lord High Executioner
A personage of noble rank and title
A dignified and potent officer,
Whose functions are particularly vital
Defer, defer
To the Lord High Executioner!
Deder, defer
To the noble Lord, to the noble Lord, to the Lord High Executioner!

KOKO
Taken from the county jail
By a set of curious changes,
Liberated then on bail
On my own recognizances;
Wafted by a fav’ring gale
As one sometimes is in trances,
To a height that few can scale,
Save by long and weary dances;
Surely never had a male
Under such like circumstances
So adventurous a tale,
Which may rank with most romances,

*CHORUS
Taken from the county jail
Liberated then on bail
Surely never had a male
So adventurous a tale
Defer, defer
To the Lord High Executioner!
Defer, defer
To the noble Lord, to the noble Lord High Executioner!
Bow down, bow down
To the Lord High Executioner!
Defer, defer
To the noble noble Lord, the High Executioner!

*KOKO
Taken from the county jail
By a set of curious changes
Surely never had a male
So adventurous a tale.

  • I’ve Got A Little List

I’ve Got A Little List

KOKO
As someday it may happen that a victim must be found,
I’ve got a little list, I’ve got a little list
Of society offenders who might well be underground
And who never would be miss’d who never would be miss’d!
There’s the pestilential niusances who write for autographs
All people who have flabby hands and irritating laughs
All children who are up in dates and flore you with’em flat
All persons who in shaking hands, shake hands with you like that
And all third persons who on spoiling tête-a- têtes insist
They’d none of ’em be miss’d, they’d none of ’em be miss’d!

CHORUS
He’s got ’em on the list, he’s got ’em on the list;
And they’ll none of ’em be miss’d
They’ll none of ’em be miss’d!

KOKO
There’s the banjo serenader, and the others of his race
And the piano organist, I’ve got him on the list!
And the people who eat peppermint and puff it in your face,
They never would be miss’d, they never would be miss’d!
Then the idiot who praises with enthusisatic tone,
All centuries but this and ev’ry country but his own;
And the lady from the provinces who dresses like a guy
And who doesn’t think she dances but would rather like to try
And that singular anomaly, the lady novelist
I don’t think she’d be miss’d, I’m sure she’d not be miss’d!

CHORUS
He’s got her on the list, he’s got her on the list;
And I don’t think she’ll be miss’d
I’m sure she’ll not be miss’d!

KOKO
And that Nisi Prius nuisance, who just now is rather rife,
The Judicial humorist I’ve got him on the list!
All funny fellows, comic men, and clowns of private life
They’d none of ’em be miss’d they’d none of ’em be miss’d!
And apologetic stesmen of a compromising kind,
Such as what d’ye call him
Thing ’em bob, and likewise Never Mind,
And ‘st-‘st-‘st and What’s his name
And also You know who
The task of filling up the blanks I’d rather leave to you
But it really doesn’t matter who you put upon the list,
For they’d none of ’em be miss’d they’d none of ’em be miss’d!

CHORUS
You may put ’em on the list, you may put ’em on the list;
And they’ll none of ’em be missed,
They’ll none of ’em be missed!

Rehearsal Section 1 Songs and Notes

Rehearsal Section Notes:

People who need to come to Section 1 rehearsal

Jesse

Carlie

Natalie

Ian

Gabe

Evie

Izzy

This first rehearsal of the section will be focusing on choreography, so wear clothes you can move comfortably in. Listen to the songs/music as much as you can, but we aren’t expecting you to have anything memorized yet.

The songs do have vocal tracks recorded, Gentlemen of Japan just has a long musical intro.

  • Song 1 : Gentlemen of Japan

Gentlemen Of Japan

*note: guys will sing “gentlemen”, girls will sing “maidens”

CHORUS, PISH TUSH, POOH BAH, PEEP BO, PITTI SING

If you want to know who we are

We are (gentlemen/maidens) of Japan

On many a vase and jar

On many a screen and fan

We figure in lively paint

Our attitude’s queer and quaint

You’re wrong if you think it ain’t

Ohhhhhh!

If you think we are worked by strings

Like a Japanese marionette

You don’t understand these things

It is simply court etiquette

Perhaps you suppose this throng

Can’t keep it up for long?

If that’s your idea you’re wrong

Ohhhhhhhh!

Ohhhhhhhh!

If that’s your idea you’re wrong

If you want to know who we are

We are (gentlemen/maidens) of Japan

On vase and jar and screen and fan

On many many

many many

many many

many many a jar

Ohhhhhhh!

Ohhhhhhh!

Ohhhhhhh!

Ohhhhhhh!

On vase and jar,  on screen and fan



  • Song 2 : Wandering Minstrel

Wandering Minstrel

NANKI-POO

A wand’ring minstrel I, a thing of shreds and patches,

Of ballads, songs, and snatches and dreamy lullaby

My catalogue is long through every passion ranging

And to your humours changing I tune my supple song

I tune my supple song

Are you in sentimental mood?

I’ll sigh with you, oh, sorrow!

On maiden’s coldness do you brood?

I’ll do so too, oh, sorrow, sorrow!

I’ll charm your willing ears with songs of lover’s fears

While sympathetic tears my cheeks bedew

Oh, sorrow, sorrow!

But if patriotic sentiment is wanted,

I’ve patriotic ballads cut and dried;

For where e’er  our country’s banner may be planted

All other local banners are defied

Our warriors in serried ranks assembled

Never quail or conceal it if they do

And I shouldn’t be surprised

If nations trembled

Before the mighty troops

The troops of Titipu

CHORUS, PEEP, PITTI, POOH, PISH

We shouldn’t be surprised if nations trembled

Trembled with alarm

Before the mighty troops

The troops of Titipu

NANKI-POO

And if you call for a song of the sea

We’ll heave the capstan round

With a yo heave ho for the wind is free

Her’s anchor’s a trip and her helm’s a lee

Hurrah for the homeward bound!

CHORUS, PEEP, PITTI, POOH, PISH

Yo ho heave ho hurrah for the homeward bound!

NANKI-POO

To lay aloft in a howling breeze may tickle a landsman’s taste

But the happiest hour a sailor sees

Is when he’s down at an inland town

With his Nancy on his knees

Yo ho!

And his arm around her waist.

CHORUS, PEEP, PITTI, POOH, PISH

Then man the capstan off we go

As the fiddler swings us round

With a yo heave ho

And a rum below

Hurrah for the homeward bound!

With a yo heave ho

And a rum below

Yo ho!

POOH, PITTI, IAN

Heave ho!

PISH, PEEP, GABE

Heave ho!

POOH, PITTI, IAN

Yo ho!

PISH, PEEP, GABE

Yo ho!

CHORUS, PEEP, PITTI, POOH, PISH

Heave ho, heave ho, heave ho, yo ho!

NANKI-POO

A wand’ring minstrel I

A thing of shreds and patches

Of ballads, songs, and snatches and dreamy lullaby

And dreamy lull-la-lull-la-by lullaby



  • Song 3 : Great Mikado

Our Great Mikado

PISH TUSH

Our great Mikado, virtuous maid

When she to rule our land essayed

Resolv’d to try

A plan whereby

Young men might best be steadied

So she decreed in words succinct

That all who flirted, leer’d, or wink’d

(Unless connubially linked),

Should forthwith be beheaded

Beheaded Behe-eh-eh-eh-eh-eh-eh-ded

Should forthwith be beheaded

And I expect you’ll all agree

That she was right to so decree

And I am right

And you are right

And all is right as right can be!

CHORUS, PEEP, PITTI, POOH

And you are right!

And we are right!

And all is right, is right as right can be!

ALL

And all is right as right can be

Right as right can be!

PISH

This stern decree you’ll understand

Caus’d great dismay

Throughout the land;

For young and old and shy and bold

Were equally affected

The youth who wink’d a roving eye

Or breath’d a non connubial sigh

Was thereupon condemed to die

He usually objected

Objected, obje-eh-eh-eh-eh-eh-eh-cted

He usually objected

And you’ll allow, as I expect

That he was right to so object

And I am right and you are right

And everything is quite correct!

CHORUS, PITTI, PEEP, POOH

And you are right

And we are right

And everything is quite, is quite correct!

ALL

And everything is quite correct, all is quite correct.

PISH

And we straight let out on bail

A convict from the county jail

Who head was next on some pretext

Condemned to be mown off

And made him headsman

For we said

“Who’s next to be decapited,

Cannot cut off another’s head,

Until he’s cut his own off,

His own off, his oh-oh-oh-oh-oh-oh-own off,

Until he’s cut his own off.”

And we are right, I think you’ll say,

To argue in this kind of way

And I am right

And you are right

And all is right

Too-loo-ral-lay

CHORUS, PEEP, PITTI, POOH

And you are right

And we are right

And all is right

Too-loo-ral-loo-ral-lay

ALL

And I am right

And you are right

And all is right!

Dinner Party – The Planning Part 1

1st in what *ought* to become a series detailing the twelve course tasting menu I cooked and served over spring break.

Although I have organized several formal multiple course dinner parties before, my plan for this menu was different from the beginning. My last dinner, while still consisting of good food, was less than the inspirational/lick-your-plate flavors I was hoping for. Overall, I and my kitchen staff, plus the hosts, agreed that the courses were mainly mild, tending toward bland. Nothing was memorable, with the exception of the cranberry orange palate cleanser, which could hardly help itself, considering its main ingredients.

Since I wanted redeem myself from this past dinner and focus on interesting food, but avoid alienating or starving any of the guests who might prefer delicate flavors, I decided to cook more courses, with even smaller quantities than I normally use. Now, my typical dinner menu has ranged from five to eight courses, but since the inspiration for these dinners was partially gained from such light reading as Miss Manner’s Guide to Excruciatingly Correct Behavior, these courses have been arranged and chosen more by ingredient than any other factor. A soup course, a seafood course, a salad course, an egg course, a meat course, a dessert course, etc.

Since I try to make the naming factor of the course the showcase ingredient for that course and invisible in all other courses, creating a longer menu was going to be tricky. Knowing that my previous limit of eight courses was still in effect as long as I held to this style, I decided to make each course more of an individual meal or a combination of dishes, rather than exclusively one dish. I was also attracted by this idea because attractive plating is more difficult when all you have to work with is a steak or slice of roast chicken and much easier when you add in some vegetables, starches, and sauces. This approach released me from the “I put the vegetables for the meal with the egg course, so I can’t have any on the seafood course” distress that I have previously been known to talk myself into and opened up a new realm of planning possibilities.

All final songs from act 2

All final songs from act one

To Buttercup, Captain Corcoran, Boatswain, etc.

Although you may or may not be a normal part of the chorus, you do have lines either in reply to the chorus or in unison with the chorus in the second act, so please read through the songs for A Female Relative’s Guide to the Second Act to determine which you need to practice.

Boatswain: please note that you are the main singer in “He is an Englishman”

A Sailor’s Guide to the First Act

Here are the sailor’s songs that are not included in the Female Relative’s Guide to the First Act. Since I’m posting @ 10:30, while this is meant to be a complete list, it may fall short, but I will check on it early this coming week for you. Also, I will try to add words, although hopefully you can understand the singing fairly easily. All of the songs in a Female Relative’s Guide are also sung by the sailors, so you will need to listen to those in addition to these three. Also remember to look at the Chorus’ guide to the Second Act for new songs.

Captain of the Pinafore

maiden fair

We sail the Ocean Blue #1

A Female Relative’s (And A Sailor’s) Guide to the Second Act

It Was The Cat!

Chorus: (all sailors, female relatives, Ralph, Josephine)
Carefully on tiptoe stealing, breathing gently as we may, every step with caution feeling, we will softly steal away.
Captain: (stamps) (chord)
Chorus: Goodness me — Why what was that?
Dick: Silent be, it was the cat.
Chorus: It was – it was the cat.
Captain: (whispered) They’re right, it was the cat!
Chorus:
Pull ashore in fashion steady, Hymen will defray the fare, for a clergyman is ready, to unite the happy pair!
Captain: (stamps) (chord)
Chorus: Goodness me, why, what was that?
Dick: Silent be, again the cat!
Chorus: It was again that cat!
Captain: (whispered) They’re right, it was the cat!
Chorus: Every step with caution feeling, we will softly steal away, every step with caution feeling, we will steal away!

He is an Englishman

Boatswain: He is an Englishman, for he himself hath said it, and it’s greatly to his credit, that he is an Englishman!
Chorus: That he is an Englishman!
Boatswain: For he might have been a Roosian, A French, or Turk, or Proosian, or perhaps I-ta-li-an!
Chorus: Or perhaps I-ta-li-an!
Boatswain: But in spite of all temptations, to belong to other nations, he remains an Englishman! He remains an Englishman.
Chorus: But in spite of all temptations, to belong to other nations, he remains an Englishman, he remains an Englishman.

Buttercup’s legend

Buttercup:
A many years ago, when I was young and charming, as some of you may know, I practiced baby-farming
Chorus:
Now this is most alarming! When she was young and charming, she practiced baby-farming, a many years ago.
Buttercup:
Two tender babes I nursed: one was of low condition, the other upper crust, a regular patrician.
Chorus: (explaining)
Now this is the position: one was of low condition, the other a patrician, a many years ago.
Buttercup:
Oh, bitter is my cup! However could I do it? I mixed those children up, and not a creature knew it.
Chorus: However could you do it? Some day, no doubt, you’ll rue it, although no creature knew it, so many years ago.
Buttercup:
In time each little waif forsook his foster-mother, the well born babe was Ralph – your captain was the other!
Chorus: They left their foster-mother, the one was Ralph, our brother, our captain was the other, a many years ago.

Finale

Captain: For he’s the Captain of the Pinafore
Chorus: (Ralph, Josephine, Female Relatives, Sailors, Sir Joseph, Buttercup) And a right good captain too!
Captain: And though before my fall I was captain of you all, now I’m a member of the crew.
Chorus: And though before his fall he was captain of us all, now he’s a member of the crew.
Chorus + Captain: Then give three cheers and one cheer more for the former Captain of the Pinafore, then give three cheers and one cheer more for the Captain of the Pinafore!
Buttercup: For I’m called Little Buttercup, dear Little Buttercup, though I could never tell why; but still I’m called Buttercup, poor Little Buttercup, Sweet Little Buttercup, aye!
Chorus: (Ralph, Josephine, Female Relatives, Sailors, Captain, Sir Joseph)
For she’s called Little Buttercup, dear Little Buttercup, though she could never tell why; but still she’s called Buttercup, poor Little Buttercup, Sweet Little Buttercup, aye!
Sir Joseph: I am the Monarch of the Sea, and when I’ve married thee, I’ll be true to the devotion that my love implants.
Hebe: Then good-bye to his sisters and his cousins and his aunts, especially his cousins whom he reckons up by dozens, and his aunts!
Chorus: (all characters)
For he is an Englishman, and he himself hath said it, and it’s greatly to his credit, that he is an Englishman, that he is an Englishman.

A Female Relative’s guide to the First Act

These are the three songs in which Sir Joseph’s female relatives sing in the first act. Due to slight differences between our copy of the script and our musical scores, the words may vary slightly from your original scripts – the words here are the words we will be using during the production:

Monarch of the Sea

Sir Joseph: I am the monarch of the sea, the ruler of the Queen’s navee, whose praise Great Britain loudly chants.
Cousin Hebe: And we are his sisters and his cousins and his aunts!
All Female Relatives (Mikayla, Dani, Lidya, Evelyn): And we are his sisters, and his cousins, and his aunts, his sisters and his cousins and his aunts.
Sir Joseph: When at anchor here I ride my bosom swells with pride, and I snap my fingers at a foeman’s taunts;
Cousin Hebe: And so do his sisters and his cousins and his aunts
All Female Relatives: And so do his sisters and his cousins and his aunts
Cousin Hebe: His sisters and his cousins and his aunts
Sir Joseph: But when the breezes blow I generally go below and seek the seclusion that a cabin grants
Cousin Hebe: And so do his sisters and his cousins and his aunts
All Female Relatives and All Sailors: and so do his sisters and his cousins and his aunts, and so do his sisters and his cousins and his aunts, his sisters and his cousins, whom he reckons up by dozens, and his aunts!

When I Was a Lad

Sir Joseph: When I was a lad I served a term as office boy to an attorney’s firm I cleaned the windows and I swept the floor and I polished up the handle of the big front door.
Female Relatives and Sailors: He polished up the handle of the big front door.
Sir Joseph: I polished up the handle so carefully that now I am the ruler of the Queen’s navee!
Female Relatives and Sailors: He polished up the handle so carefully that now he is the ruler of the Queen’s navee.
Sir Joseph: As office boy I made such a mark that they gave me the post of a junior clerk, I served the writs with a smile so bland, and I copied all the letters in a big round hand.
Female Relatives and Sailors: And he copied all the letters in a big round hand.
Sir Joseph: I copied all the letters in a hand so free that now I am the ruler of the Queen’s navee!
Female Relatives and Sailors: He copied all the letters in a hand so free that now he is the ruler of the Queen’s navee!
Sir Joseph: In serving writs I made such a name that an articled clerk I soon became, I wore clean collars and a bran’ new suit for the pass examination at the Institute.
Female Relatives and Sailors: For the pass examination at the Institute.
Sir Joseph: That pass examination did so well for me that now I am the ruler of the Queen’s navee!
Female Relatives and Sailors: That pass examination did so well for he that now he is the ruler of the Queen’s navee.
Sir Joseph: Of legal knowledge I acquired such a grip that they took me into the partnership, and that Junior partnership I ween was the only ship that I ever had seen
Female Relatives and Sailors: Was the only ship that he ever had seen
Sir Joseph: But that kind of ship so suited me that now I am the ruler of the Queen’s navee!
Female Relatives and Sailors: But that kind of ship so suited he that now he is the ruler of the Queen’s navee.
Sir Joseph: I grew so rich that I was sent by a pocket borough into Parliament, I always voted at my party’s call and I never thought of thinking for myself at all
Female Relatives and Sailors: And he never thought of thinking for himself at all.
Sir Joseph: I thought so little they rewarded me by making me the ruler of the Queen’s navee.
Female Relatives and Sailors: He thought so little they rewarded he by making him the ruler of the Queen’s navee.
Sir Joseph: Now landsmen all, whomever you may be, if you want to rise to the top of the tree, if your soul isn’t fettered to an office stool, be careful to be guided by this golden rule.
Female Relatives and Sailors: Be careful to be guided by this golden rule.
Sir Joseph: Stick close to your desks and never go to sea, and you all may be rulers of the Queen’s navee.
Female Relatives and Sailors: Stick close to your desks and never go to sea and you all may be rulers of the Queen’s navee.

Oh Joy, Oh Rapture

All sing (Carlie, Natalie, Dani, Mikayla, Lidya, Evie, Gabe, Rich, Ben):

Oh joy, oh rapture unforeseen
For now the sky is all serene

The god of day – the orb of love
Has hung his ensign high above

The sky is all ablaze

With wooing words and loving song
We’ll chase the lagging hours along

And if he finds the maiden coy
He’ll murmur forth decorous joy
In dreamy roundelays